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20110705
20110705
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
in the south and to the eastern border with pakistan where al qaeda still operates. general david petraeus is retiring from the army later this month and will become the new director of the c.i.a. mandy clark spoke with him today in kabul about the way forward in afghanistan. >> reporter: the last days of general david petraeus's command have been marked by two major events: the president's decision to begin withdrawing u.s. forces and, days later, an audacious attack on one of kabul's most important hotels. general petraeus told us the assault should not be seen as a setback. do you really think that the afghan security forces are ready if they can't protect a major hotel in the capital? >> i can tell you that our special forces who were supporting-- not leading and not doing-- for the afghan forces, who saw the crisis response unit, said that they responded very courageously. in fact, that they took the loss of life with the wounded in action i think underscores that fact. >> reporter: but the training of afghan forces is uneven at best. witnesses at the hotel told us some afghan police
is in captivity. that's happened, for instance, in pakistan with a man named umar, a columnist, who was abducted and sexually assaulted. he was sodomized in retribution for his writing. >> warner: a lot of these victims at least the women, have never told their stories before to anyoee other than friends or family. why not? >> there are a number of reasons. the biggest one i heard from international correspondents was the fear of losing assignments. i have spoken to at least two journalists that told me that they were taken off assignments specifically because they came forward to talk about their sexual assault. so it really does happen. they don't want to be appear to be weak or vulnerable. women told me repeatedly that they had worked very hard to overcome this sense that they were the weaker gender in this profession and that them didn't feel that they could reveal that they had been raped without it making them look somehow more vulnerable.รงรง there are also.... >> warner: what about the local reporters? what were usually their reason for not saying anything? >> a lot of different cultura
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)